Shoot Me Up Doc, I Ain’t Afraid!*

Early on in the pandemic when it became apparent that there was no way the world could return to normal unless there was a vaccine for COVID-19, it seemed such a thing was a long way off. But here we are, and granted there is a pecking order for who gets this first, with those of us unessential workers who are healthy low on the list, the news that the vaccine is rolling out is a great thing.

As with anything in these United States, there are lots of opinions. While my social media feeds don’t include anti-vaxxers (that I know of, and if so, I clearly need to diversify my acquaintances), there are many thoughtful individuals who are also wary. Vaccines normally take time to develop, test, and roll out; often years in some cases. So, it’s not entirely far-fetched for some to feel a bit worried about something that has come out in a matter of months.

But here’s where good sense, trust in science and the medical community, and facts have to be depended upon. No, there aren’t microchips embedded in the vaccine the government will use to track us all. We have smartphones and Alexa to listen in on us anyway.  And no, the vaccine is not made up of deadly chemicals that will render the fertile, infertile, and tousle your DNA into who knows what.

While there are always exceptions to the rule, and yes, we are all going to have to watch and see what happens to a certain extent, getting this vaccine is crucial to the country’s dire need to move forward and get strong again.

Does this post sound like a lot of Wilo’s opinions? I’m sure it could. So, let’s check in with the CDC, shall we?

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/vaccine-benefits/facts.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fvaccines%2Fabout-vaccines%2Fvaccine-myths.html

  1. It takes a few weeks for the human body to build immunity, and as we have heard, the vaccine needs to be administered in two dosages with varying times between them depending on the manufacturer). What this means is, you can’t run around barhopping and mask-less with one stick. It is still in excellent form to wear a mask and social distance for a little bit until you complete doses and have let enough time pass.
  2. The vaccine will not cause you to have a positive COVID test result.
  3. If you have gotten COVID and recovered, the vaccine can still benefit you.
  4. This vaccine can indeed keep you from getting sick with COVID even if you experience no symptoms.
  5. If you’ve heard this mRNA thing thrown around and are convinced your DNA will be tampered with, it won’t. According to the CDC, “The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enter the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA are kept. This means the mRNA does not affect or interact with our DNA in any way.” See that folks? Science.

By all means, research this more from REPUTABLE SOURCES AND MEDICAL JOURNALS THROUGH ARTICLES WRITTEN BY BOARD CERTIFIED PHYSICIANS AND ACCREDITED SCIENTISTS.” And no, the YouTube video made by that lady in church who only eats raw greens does not count (unless she falls in the above criteria).

Doing your homework is always the right thing to do, but I beg you—think also of the greater good of not just yourself, but your greater community. We are all in this together and the sooner the majority of the population cooperates, the faster we can all get back to living our lives socializing, traveling, working, and giving back to those who need our help.

My two cents? Suck it buttercups and get your shots. Maybe there’ll even be a lollipop in it for you.

*Thank you for this priceless gem, Cameran Eubanks Wimberly.

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